2010 column: ‘America’s moral crisis is threat to our security’

For the past week we have been treated to the spectacle of the mainstream media lecturing President Trump for talking about the dangers of a porous border. They call him a fear monger and a racist; they ridicule him for calling himself a nationalist; they say national sovereignty is out-dated.

Well, I beg to differ. The president’s recognition of the existential crisis facing the United States of America is what got him elected in 2016, and will get him re-elected in 2020.

Here’s the start of a column I wrote in 2010 for the Daily Inter Lake that described the moral crisis facing the United States on the border. It’s just as true today, probably more so, but now we have a president who recognizes the danger and is doing something about it.


America’s moral crisis is threat to our security

Without law enforcement, there is no law.

Without law, there is no justice.

Without justice, there is no security.

Without security, there is no freedom.


Without freedom, there is nothing to distinguish the United States of America from every other middling-poor debtor country in the world.

And that, in a nutshell, is why every American from sea to shining sea should be down on his or her knees thanking God for the Arizona legislature taking a courageous stand in favor of principle over politics.

But instead, we have to listen to the relentless anti-American rhetoric of politicians, media celebrities and grand-standing “civil rights” guardians who have declared that Arizona is now the devils’ country — to be spurned, boycotted, and ridiculed.

And for what?


Because Arizona has boldly declared that criminal activity by those who have entered our country illegally should be discouraged and deterred. In common parlance, this is called law enforcement, and thus should be the backbone of our liberty. Instead, it has become the rallying cry for anarchists — who think any law is tyrannical — and demagogues — who think any crisis is a means to power.

Anarchists and demagogues will eventually tear each other apart, but while it is convenient they will first try to tear the country apart. And that is where we are today, with law-breaking being rewarded and “law-abiding” being deemed code for racism.

It appears that the United States is well on its way to a moral crisis, if not a constitutional one. What else can one surmise from the topsy-turvy reaction to this new Arizona law, which merely says that a crime is a crime?

It’s not as though we didn’t all know there was a problem with illegal immigration. Arizona certainly did. Illegal immigrants comprise 11 percent of Arizona’s prison population, and in Maricopa County 22 percent of prosecuted felonies were committed by illegal immigrants.


Of course, one would hope and expect that the arrest, detention and expulsion of illegal aliens would be the business of the federal government, but counting on the D.C. politicians to fix the problem has gotten us somewhere between 12 million and 20 million illegal aliens in the past 25 years. If Congress saw AIG and Goldman Sachs as “too big to fail,” they apparently see the illegal-immigration problem as “too big to fix.”

That’s why Arizona’s legislature stepped forward to do what is necessary to protect their citizens and their taxpayers from the growing social and economic problems caused by having more than half a million illegal aliens in their state.

Here’s the rest of the column at the Daily Inter Lake.

#border #buildthewall #trump #nationalsecurity


2 thoughts on “2010 column: ‘America’s moral crisis is threat to our security’

  1. Excellent comments then and more appropriate now. No one is addressing the root cause of our problems which you outline here. No amount of money can solve the core problems. We the people must do it or perish.

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